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Top Tips For Treating Your Dog This Christmas

‘Tis the season to be jolly, and we sure make the most of the festive season. It’s a time to give to those we love. Here at Puppy Essentials, we’re going to make sure you don’t forget about treating your dog during the Christmas period!

From gifts and treats, to spending time with your four-legged companions and helping them cope with the Christmas chaos – here are our top tips for treating your dog this Christmas:

Treats & Gifts

To get us started, we know that like us, you don’t want your pups to miss out on the Christmas joy of opening gifts. Don’t worry; we’ve got you covered on that front – with the Christmas Dog Treat Box at Puppy Essentials!

What’s in the box?” I hear you say, well…

  • Hand-Written Christmas Card
  • Rudolph Plush Toy
  • Dog Christmas Cracker (No Bang!)
  • Shooting Star Lollipup (Cranberry & Choc Chip)
  • Snowball Tugger
  • Christmas Tree Treat (Christmas Dinner Flavour)
  • Christmas Poultry Sausage
  • Pawsecco (alcohol free)

Sounds good, huh? Well, if this is something you want to chase up, you can find it on our website!

You can also check out our Christmas Gift Guide already posted on Puppy Hub!

Festive Food

We know how it is, sat there at the table, staring down the remainder of your Christmas Dinner – you’ve given it a good go, but you simply cannot finish it.

DO NOT FEED THIS TO YOUR DOG.

Many items of your Christmas Dinner are not suitable for dogs. Avoid feeding your dog:

  • Turkey Skin
  • Turkey Fat
  • Cooked Bones
  • Turkey Carcass
  • Bread Dough
  • Cake Mix
  • Chocolate/Sweets
  • Grapes/Raisins
  • Gravy
  • Nuts
  • Stuffing
  • Spicy Sauces
  • Onions

These foods do not settle with dogs and some cases are considered poisonous for them.

It’s also important not to allow your dog to overindulge, when eating food/treats that are suitable. Overeating paired with the excitement that Christmas brings can result in an upset tummy for your dog.

Practicality & Decorations

We all know that decorating your homes with festive decorations and ornaments plays a big role during the Christmas period.

Be wary, though, that seasonal plants such as Holly, Ivy, Miseltoe and Poinsettias are poisonous to dogs (and cats too) and can cause irritation and in some cases, vomiting and diarrhoea. It’s also worth being mindful that your dog isn’t swallowing any needle-shaped leaves from your Christmas Tree, as they could cause punctures when consumed.

Try to consider how your dog may behave at certain times during the Christmas period, when arranging your decorations around the house. If you think they may be boisterous and lively, it may be a wise move to keep any fragile ornaments (glass or porcelain perhaps) away from the floor and your dog – for both the ornaments and your dogs safety. Try to keep them away from tinsel, too, as it won’t be any good for their tummies.

Christmas Chaos

Christmas is an exciting time, sometimes a little too exciting, to the point of chaos. This isn’t only stressful for us, but more so for our dogs. In times when it becomes a bit too crowded, your dog may appreciate a quiet room or spot in the house to retreat to, so they aren’t overwhelmed.

It’s important to maintain a routine throughout the Christmas period. Ensure that they are taken out as often as they should be and that you yourself are making a conscious effort to spend time with them. This will give them plenty of opportunities to relax and unwind from the hectic happenings back home.

Hopefully these tips can help you make the Christmas Period just as magical for your dog as it is for us!

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